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Allen Money

                                 /-- Money Family Tree History
                                 |
                            /-- Jacob Money Sr. (b. c. 1748-Person County, N. Carolina)
                            |
                       /-- William Money Sr. (b. c. 1774-Person County, N. Carolina)
                       |    |
                       |    \-- Susannah (Money)
                       |
                  /-- Allen Money (b. c. 1802-Surry County, N. Carolina)
                 |     |
                 |     \-- Eady Cooper (b. c. 1776)
                 |
            /-- Mary (Polly) Elizabeth Money (b. c. 1830-Surry County, N. Carolina)
            |    |
            |    \-- Elizabeth (Money) (b. c. 1807)
            |
      /-- Lewis William Money (b. c. 1866)
      |
 /-- William Clifford Money (b. 14 Jul 1893-Yadkin County, N. Carolina)
 |    |
 |    \-- Salena Holcomb
 |
Naomi Ruth (Money) Powers (b. 24 May 1913-Cripple Creek, Wythe County, Va.)
 |
 \-- Lena Myrtle Graham (b. 24 Jul 1894-Pulaski, Va.)

Editor's Note: The text in this section of the Money Family Tree has been adapted from an informal research paper entitled "The Money Family of Yadkin County North Carolina and Tazewell County Virginia as Descended From Jacob Money of the French House of Monnett." This research paper was concluded in June 2000, and was written by Michael Money, Nyoka Money and Kenneth Money. My thanks to the authors.


Allen Money does not have a marriage bond recorded in the state of North Carolina. According to a State of North Carolina archive worker, this would not be uncommon if the couple were married in a church. Allen was probably married between 1825 and 1828 to a young lady with the first name Elizabeth (this is based on the 1850 census that lists not only head of household but the persons living in that household). We believe her surname was Collins or Holcomb. We base this on the fact that in most census records the Collins, Holcombs and Moneys lived in close proximity to each other. Their land often adjoined each other. The children of these founding families would often marry one another. A visit to the local cemeteries in Yadkin County often showed the families to be buried in close proximity to each other. We were not able to locate a church roster with Allen and Elizabeth. However, that would not be uncommon as many of the early church records are no longer intact.

On Aug. 2, 1828, William Money Sr. deeded a parcel of real estate to Allen Money. It is very possible that Allen and Elizabeth had just gotten married and this was to be property on which they would build a home and raise their family. This deed is recorded in Book 5, page 169. Transcribing from the original deed on file, we submit the following:

  1. Allen Money paid $60.00 on hand to William Money "on the waters of Deep Creek"
  2. "Beginning at a white oak below the mill dam on the creek running due north to Isaac Money's line then with his line west to Henry Hambriell's line"
  3. It appears that William made a slight stipulation in the deed stated as follows: "Beginning the ? land by water by using a mill except laid out for 35 acres be the same more or less with every right"
  4. The deed ends as follows "Little or (?) belonging or anywise apportioning to the same from me and my heirs or any just claim of any person or persons to the said Allen Money and his heirs for ever free and clear from all incumbencies what so ever"
  5. Witnesses: P. Holcomb and John Money "Processed in open court by John Money's oath" Surry County Court.

The 1820 Surry County tax list records John Money Sr, Isaac Money, and William Money Sr all owning land that adjoined Philip Holcomb. Notice the language in this deed from William to Allen that reads: "from me and my heirs" and "Allen Money and (?) his heirs." We believe this is more clear reasoning that Allen was William Sr's son.

A blacksmith's anvil and hammer

A blacksmith's anvil and hammer.

Around this time period of 1820-1830 America was expanding but also growing with controversy, although most of the political arguments probably affected the farmer and small labor families such as the Moneys very slightly, if at all. The roots of political unrest were growing into a much larger problem. In 1820 the Missouri Compromise was reached over the issue of slavery. In 1828 a Tariff Issue was very controversial with the South, in particular South Carolina. Andrew Jackson was elected President in 1828, in many ways a very strong-willed individual. The economies of North and South were taking two very different roads.

As explained earlier, Allen Money was chosen several times between 1828 and 1833 to help with the maintenance of the roads in which he lived around Deep Creek. He appears to have been a good citizen, willing and able to answer his civic call of duty to the community.

The 1830 Surry County census was organized differently than previous census records. Before 1850 all census records were organized around the head of the household alone. As you have witnessed thus far, the head's name was given and the remainder of the household were counted as "males" and "females" and their approximate ages recorded. The ages given usually fell within a ten year bracket or more, not the exact age.

The 1830 Surry County census records the following for Allen Money:

Males
Under Age 5Ages 5-20Ages 20-30
  1
(Allen)

Females
Under Age 5Ages 5-20Ages 20-30
2
(? Daughter)
(Mary "Polly" or "Pollie" Money)
 1
(Elizabeth)

Allen and Elizabeth had two daughters five or younger. This supports our theory that they were not married over five years in 1830. They could have been married as late as 1828 judging by the land deed with William in that year. Mary "Polly" or "Pollie" Money will be a rather intriguing individual for the next generation of our Money lineage.

Between 1830 and 1840 the only record we were able to obtain on Allen with the exception of the road records, was a tax list for the Jonesville District of Surry County in 1835. The record shows Allen Money owning 100 acres of land with a combined worth of $150 dollars.

After 1850 most of the region in which the Moneys lived around Deep Creek would then become Yadkin County. Before 1850 Surry covered all the geography which now encompasses Surry and Yadkin counties. Thus pre-1850 records from either area must be accessed from Surry County.

The years of 1830-1840 continued to see an increase in political turmoil around the nation. This era was riddled with controversy on the National Bank issue with President Jackson bitterly fighting the institution. In 1832 South Carolina created a crisis by nullifying another tariff that the Jackson Administration supported. In 1837 America fought through an economic panic and the South was slowly being isolated and drawing a cloak around itself. The Money family probably noticed little impact in Surry County over these issues except perhaps some tight pennies around 1837.

Between 1830 and 1840 Allen and Elizabeth's family continued to expand. The census record of 1840 Surry County shows the number of children, and we have listed the names in parentheses based on the 1850 census.

Males
Under Age 5Ages 5-10Ages 40-50
1
(Hosea)
1
(Called "Levi" in 1850 census
and Lewis in the 1860 census)
1
(Allen)

Females
Under Age 5Ages 5-10Ages 30-40
1
(Called Mary in the 1850 census
and Martha in the 1860 census)
2
(? Daughter)
(Mary "Polly" "Pollie")
1
(Elizabeth)

It is unclear why Allen and Elizabeth had two daughters named Mary. Mary "Polly" "Pollie" was the older of the two Marys. Remember in the both the 1830 and the 1840 census two females are shown . This other female could have been older and out of the home in the 1850 census or she may have died between the 1840 census and the 1850 census. We believe Mary "Polly" "Pollie" was born about 1830. This is based on the listing of her age in the 1850, 1870, 1880 and 1900 census. The 1890 United States Federal Census reports were burned in a fire in 1921 and no complete copies exist. Mary "Martha" was probably born about 1833.

Allen had an aunt (William Sr.'s sister born in 1790) named Mary, and possibly Elizabeth had some relatives named Mary, therefore, they could have named two daughters Mary -- one for a relative on each side of the family. Or one was named Mary Martha and the other Pollie E. Money, as this is the name on her headstone at the Mt. View Baptist Church Cemetery in Yadkin County. We believe the "E" is probably Elizabeth after her mother. Even to add more confusion to the names, a female listed as Patsey in 1850 is listed as Polly in 1860 and a male named Levi in 1850 is called Lewis in 1860! One must remember that the census takers were members of the community that possessed some reading and writing skills. Any member of the household (adult or child) could have given the information to the census taker. Nicknames were often substituted for the formal name. "Mary," even more than in modem day, was a very common name for a girl. "Polly" and "Pollie" are an old English nickname for Mary. The two names are interchangeable.

A farm garden and outbuilding

A farm garden and outbuilding.

The time period of 1840-1850 in America was a time of expansion. The Presidencies of John Tyler and James K. Polk dominated the era. Expansion westward was on the rise, especially into Oregon, and, later, California. Texas became a state in 1845 and America went to war with Mexico. The United States triumphed and the war ended in 1848 with all border territories secured. The anti-slavery movement was gaining a louder voice in the North, while in the South the region continued farming and withdrawing from a Federal threat. As 1850 approached in Surry County, the average person was probably hearing a certain amount of anti-Yankee rhetoric. Even in some less politically important areas such as Northwestern North Carolina and Southwestern Virginia people were beginning to resent Northerners and their constant slurs of the Southern people.

Through the 1850s this sentiment would continue to grow all over the South. Yadkin County, (Surry County before 1850), was a close knit society. Everyone knew their neighbors. Each community had a church, one-room school, and perhaps a store and a mill. People used homemade herbs and remedies for sicknesses. The people of the region were self-sufficient workers who knew how to live off the land (Casstevens, Yadkin County).

During this period between 1840 and 1850 Allen Money sold a parcel of land to Leroy Holcomb. Recorded in Book 5, page 175 the extract reads: Allen Money to Leroy Holcomb Sold 8 May, 1847 Landmarks: Deep Creek. Philip Holcomb's run formerly Isaac Money 's line Leroy Holcomb's mill pond William Money Jr. now P. Holcomb Witnesses: P. Holcomb. William Ashley.

Recall that Isaac Money's line is mentioned in the 1828 deed from William Sr. to Allen. As the 1850 census documents the Holcombs will be living next door to Allen and Elizabeth Money. Although the nickname "Raleigh" will be used, it refers to Leroy Holcomb.

When the 1850 census was released, every member of the household was mentioned by name, age, and occupation, if applicable. The Federal census was moving into a new and more advanced stage of documentation. Thus, from this point onward, census records will be listed by name, age, gender, and occupation. It sometimes lists the property value, and always lists the state in which each person was born. Census takers often used nicknames etc., depending on the person doing the informing and the person doing the census!

Why were Mary Money and Henry Cheeks living with Raleigh (Leroy) Holcomb? It could have been several reasons why such an arrangement would have been made. Mary (Polly or Pollie) Money was 20 years old. Most girls in that era were married between ages 16-18. On occasion they would rarely reach age 20 or a little older before marriage. Perhaps Mary Money was being paid a small amount of money to help Winey with the house and kids. Her parents, Allen and Elizabeth, lived next door so she may have conversed between the two houses. Maybe she was simply visiting when the census recorder made his round.

A similar situation could have applied to Henry Cheeks. It is recorded that he owned $300 of real estate. He may have been visiting or maybe he owned a small parcel of land adjoining Raleigh Holcomb and they worked together on the farm. It is interesting to note that both Mary (Polly or Pollie) Money and Henry Cheeks could not read or write according to the census. Maybe work in exchange for a little support from Raleigh Holcomb was the best they could muster at the time.

Whatever the situation in Mary and Henry's case, they ability to find better employment was limited by not being able to read and write. Many people of that day could do neither. The census lists Raleigh Holcomb and his household, Allen Money and his household, and the following household was:

NameAgeGender / Occupation / Real Estate
William Money80male / farmer/ (not listed)
Eda72female

William Money Sr. and Eda (or Eady) were living directly next door to Allen, their son. This corresponds with the earlier land records of William's place of residency, and his deed to Allen in 1828, which was a parcel of his own land. William and Eda (Eady) lived a very full life for those days. Their ages are good by modem standards in the year 2000. In 1850 he was living next to one of his sons, Allen, along with quick and simple access to his grandchildren. It is unknown of William and Eda's condition at this time but their ages testify to a very rewarding and successful life!

The ten years between 1850 and 1860 were years of turmoil that paved the way for war between North and South. Three men known as the "Great Compromisers" (John C. Calhoun, Henry Clay; and Daniel Webster) all died by 1852. Calhoun died in 1850, Clay and Webster in 1852. A new generation of "fire eaters" and hotheaded radicals would take over government who did not seek compromise. This was the case in the North and the South.

Calhoun, Clay, and Webster were really the three men who saved the Union from collapse between 1820 and 1850. One of Calhoun's last public comments in 1850 was "The South, the poor South. What will become of her now?" In 1854 the Kansas Nebraska Act created a crisis in Kansas that caused a bloodbath over free versus slave territory. In 1856 two politicians (from Massachusetts and South Carolina) became physically violent in the chamber floor. In 1857 the Dread Scott Decision declared slaves to be only property by the Supreme Court, and in 1859 John Brown led a raid on the Federal arsenal at Harper's Ferry, Virginia (which would later become West Virginia). The Union was truly anything but "United" in the 1850s.

A blacksmith at work

A blacksmith at work.

By 1860 the population of the region was obviously increasing and a new generation establishing families. The 1860 census recorded Allen's occupation as a "cooper." A cooper is a barrel maker, someone who assembles barrels or tubs that require a metal strapping (or ring) to be banded around the outside. It is unclear how long Allen had been making barrels. The 1850 census recorded Allen as a "laborer." This is a broad word and could include a multitude of occupations. As population increased, travel was becoming a bit more accessible, and demand becoming higher, a barrel maker was probably a good paying and rewarding occupation. Goods that were shipped out of Yadkin County by wagon, and possibly the surrounding area, could have been hauled in barrels made by Allen.

The 1860 census is the last mention of Allen we have been able to access. He will not be present in the 1870 census of Yadkin County or any surrounding counties. As the nation stood on the brink of war, Allen Money died sometime in the 1860s. The exact date is unknown. He was pushing 60 years old, and in the 1860s medical care was still very primitive. He could have died of influenza or a simple illness which modern medicine could have cured and extended his life. It is all speculation. He could have died from the stress of the Civil War and its multitude of ailments that accompanied the era from 1861-1865.


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