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William Money Sr.

                                 /-- Money Family Tree History
                                 |
                            /-- Jacob Money Sr. (b. c. 1748-Person County, N. Carolina)
                            |
                       /-- William Money Sr. (b. c. 1774-Person County, N. Carolina)
                       |    |
                       |    \-- Susannah (Money)
                       |
                  /-- Allen Money (b. c. 1802-Surry County, N. Carolina)
                 |     |
                 |     \-- Eady Cooper (b. c. 1776)
                 |
            /-- Mary (Polly) Elizabeth Money (b. c. 1830-Surry County, N. Carolina)
            |    |
            |    \-- Elizabeth (Money) (b. c. 1807)
            |
      /-- Lewis William Money (b. c. 1866)
      |
 /-- William Clifford Money (b. 14 Jul 1893-Yadkin County, N. Carolina)
 |    |
 |    \-- Salena Holcomb
 |
Naomi Ruth (Money) Powers (b. 24 May 1913-Cripple Creek, Wythe County, Va.)
 |
 \-- Lena Myrtle Graham (b. 24 Jul 1894-Pulaski, Va.)

Editor's Note: The text in this section of the Money Family Tree has been adapted from an informal research paper entitled "The Money Family of Yadkin County North Carolina and Tazewell County Virginia as Descended From Jacob Money of the French House of Monnett." This research paper was concluded in June 2000, and was written by Michael Money, Nyoka Money and Kenneth Money. My thanks to the authors.


William Money Sr. is one of the earlier sons of Jacob Money Sr. and Mrs. (Susannah) Money. One source {Latter Day Saints) list his date of birth about 1774. The census records for Surry County 1850 list William as age 80, which would indicate a birth year of 1770. However, one must keep in mind that the early census takers were members of the community that could read and write. Other researchers and archive workers have told us that most of the people in this time period could not read and write and a discrepancy of up to five years is not uncommon. Even the names often may not correspond, depending on the person in the household giving the information.

According to the Latter Day Saints, Jack Money, and Person County records, William Money and Eady Cooper were married in Person County, North Carolina on March 18, 1799. This is also substantiated by the Person County 1800 census index (page 197) listing William Money as head of household. A copy of this page is as follows:

Males
To age 1010 to 16 yrs16 to 26 yrs26 to 45 yrs45+ yrs
1
(son that died
in early childhood?)
  1
(William Sr)
 

Females
To age 1010 to 16 yrs16 to 26 yrs26 to 45 yrs45+ yrs
  1
(servant or relative
that was helping
Eady after the
birth of first
born son?)
1
(Eady)
 

Please note that William's father, Jacob Money, purchased land in Surry County in April 1801. The family unit appeared to be moving from Person County into Surry County. One theory may be the abundance of real estate at reasonable prices. People were gradually moving westward to obtain abundant new land. William Sr. purchased land as recorded in Book N page 168 (William Money from Allen Gentry 18 Feb. 1802 about 200 acres for $310. Landmarks: headwaters of Deep Creek Recorded 1815). Other land deeds are also documented for the purchase of real estate by William in Surry County. These documents are recorded in the Money Land Deeds from Surry County but do not list acreage or dates.

Some of William's siblings also came to Surry County as indicated in land deeds in the early 1800s (Isaac Money and John Money). John Money later became a constable in Surry County. A constable in this time period (1800s) would be equivalent to a Chief Deputy or even a Sheriff in the twentieth or twenty-first centuries. His name is found on many legal documents as a witness during this time period.

This early era of American history was very rugged. The capital was moved from Philadelphia to Washington D.C. in 1800 and the majority of people still lived within 150-200 miles of the coastal regions. Those who did not, such as the Money family, traveled by rugged wagon roads hewn out of the mountains and plateaus. Cabins, home spun clothes and farming were the common way of life. Life was hard, but simple and conservative. Thomas Jefferson was President for most of the period championing the small farmer class and battling big government. In 1808 legal slave trade was banned in the United States.

As William and Eady settled into Surry County, their family began to increase with the birth of other children as indicated in the 1810 Surry County census:

Males
To age 1010 to 16 yrs16 to 26 yrs26 to 45 yrs45+ yrs
4
(See chart below)
  1
(William Sr)
 

We are unsure at this point in research who the four boys were in this census. However we firmly believe that two of the boys can be identified. The chart below identifies the boys,

NameApproximate Date of Birth
Allen1802
Johnson1804

William Money Junior was born on April 20, 1801. He would appear to be the logical choice for the third son of William Money Senior. However, this does not appear to be the case. Another Money family researcher, Omeda Brewer, who has much experience and expertise in genealogy, spoke with us and shared her studies on the issue of "Junior" and "Senior." She says that experts have concluded the titles "Junior" and "Senior" do not necessarily distinguish father and son. Today we would view it in terms of father and son. In the early 1800s, a man may name his son in honor of a beloved brother and call him "Junior" to distinguish him from the brother in tax, census, land records, etc. This may seems awkward to us today but in that era it was rather common.

In our research, we were fortunate enough to have made contact with e-mail researcher "1k jump," who's aunt has a copy of William Money Junior's granddaughter's Bible. When sent a transcript of that Bible, we had to rethink and revise our data on the children of William and Eady Money. Her Bible record clearly states that John Money is the son of Isaac. Isaac also had a brother, John, who was constable in Surry County. Even the 1820 Surry County census lists a John Money Sr and John Money Jr. However, they are clearly not father and son! The format of the Bible also suggests that William and Howell are sons of Isaac Money. This appears to be the case, and as Nancy Money Turnage (another researcher with much experience and expertise) said, "It is hard to dispute a Bible record with such precise dates."

A colonial farmhouse and outbuildings

A colonial farmhouse and outbuildings.

During the time period of 1807-1833, caring for the roads was a community duty. All eligible able-bodied people in the community attended to the stretches of road on which they lived. Juries of commissioners were charged with the creating, changing or inspecting of roads. Furthermore, road overseers were appointed annually by the County Court. The County Court met four times yearly (in February, May, August, and November). Overseers' appointments oftentimes give details concerning the bounds of their responsibilities. However, in many instances, the appointment simply says "in room of" a previous overseer. It is also worthy to note that William Money Sr and Isaac Money's land adjoined one another according to the 1820 Surry County tax records. John Money's land adjoined Philip Holcomb, who adjoined Isaac Money.

In these road records for February 1828, several of the Money names listed are: John Money, Johnson Money, Howell Money and Allen Money.

The Money names recorded in May of 1828 include Johnson Money, Allen Money and John Money.

The Money names recorded in August 1830 include William Money Jr., Allen Money, Howell Money, David Money and Henry Money.

The Money names recorded for the February 1832 term include Johnson Money, Allen Money and John Money.

Finally, in 1833, the last record of Money names ordered Howell Money appointed overseer and the following names as maintenance workers: William Money Jr., Allen Money, David Money and Henry Money. There is a reference to "Reinheart's Mill where it crosses the Wilkes Road leading out of Hamptonville" as the road the Moneys were responsible to maintain. The remains of Reinheart's Mill can be seen today off of Longtown Road in Yadkin County. This property is still maintained by the Reinheart family. The present resident is the great-great-grandson of the builder of the mill. This mill was struck by lightning in the early 1950s and burned to the ground. Mortar brick and stones can be seen along the creek bank along with the stone structure support of the old wagon bridge.

By this time period, most of this generation of our line had moved to Surry County. Census records, land records, tax records and the above road records indicate they lived near each other in the Knobs/Deep Creek area. As previously noted, William Sr, Isaac, and John Money's land all adjoined one another in 1820. The 1816 tax list shows John and Morgan Money owning adjoining land. Other tax records from various years ranging from 1816-1822 clearly show all the Moneys bordering and living in close proximity to one another. Neighbors of the Moneys in these years included names such as Philip Holcomb, Thomas Vanhoy, Obadiah Collins, Thomas Day, Robert Pennix, Robert Peniso, Benedict Castevens and John Shores.

Other researchers and various records have pointed out that Henry Money was the son of John Money Sr. David Money was a younger son of Jacob Money. John, Howell and William Jr. belonged to Isaac according to the family Bible. This leaves Allen and Johnson. We can document that Allen was the son of William Senior, and it appears that Johnson must have also been his son.

As were several other eras in American history, 1810-1820 was a rather unstable time in some respects. James Madison was President from 1809-1817 and led the War of 1812, which lasted until 1815. This was the only time Washington D.C. was invaded and burned in American history (1814). New modes of transportation began to be investigated and put into place around this time, such as canals and national roads, which surpassed mountain paths. Most of this progress excluded the South due to their resistance of Federal control in their states.

For further documentation, the 1820 Surry County census also records William Money Sr's family as follows:

Males
To age 1010 to 16 yrs16 to 18 yrs16 to 26 yrs26 to 45 yrs45+ yrs
  1 (?)2
(Allen and Johnson)
 1
(William Sr)

Females
To age 1010 to 16 yrs16 to 18 yrs16 to 26 yrs26 to 45 yrs45+ yrs
1
(Unknown)
1
(Unknown)
   1
(Eady)

We could not find any explanation of why age 16 is listed three times and how to determine which age bracket a person of age 17 or 18 would be counted.


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